EPA claims toxic chemical in Roundup doesn't cause cancer

The EPA continues to back the use of glyphosate in Roundup, even after it has been identified as a carcinogenic.

    2019/05/09

NSFW    WASHINGTON — The EPA continues to back the use of glyphosate in Roundup, even after it has been identified as a carcinogenic.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved the use of glyphosate in the herbicide Roundup."

Their endorsement comes despite findings by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer that claim glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic to humans."

According to the National Pesticide Information Center, glyphosate is a non-selective herbicide first introduced in 1974 by Monsanto. Glyphosate blocks protein production of an enzyme in certain plants, preventing them from growing.

According to National Geographic, Roundup is the second most widely used herbicide in the US. It can be used in farms, gardens, and weeds in urban areas.

Humans can be exposed to glyphosate if herbicides come in contact with their skin and eyes or by breathing it in during spraying.

Monsanto has recently lost two cases against cancer patients that claim exposure to glyphosate present in Roundup caused their non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

However, the company continues to state that the chemical is safe to use, saying in a statement, "Bayer firmly believes that the science supports the safety of glyphosate-based herbicides, which are some of the most thoroughly studied products of their kind, and is pleased that the regulators tasked with assessing this extensive body of science continue to reach favorable conclusions."
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